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New Facility New Facility
Modernized Modernized
Bethune PK-8 Project Budget $8,605,811
  • Close the smaller PreK-1 site four blocks away
  • Renovate 63,000 square feet of main building
  • Improve energy efficiency by adding alternative energy systems
Brightmoor PK-8 Project Budget $32,180,556
  • Construct 21st century educational facility using DPS PreK-8 template
  • Consolidate 138,153 square feet from other schools
  • Facility will incorporate energy efficiency and alternative fuels
Chadsey High School (will become Chadsey PK-12) Project Budget $41,488,148
  • The PreK-12 campus will include a dual-use media center and pool and shared use of the nearby city park
  • Geothermal alternative energy will create lower energy costs and reduced carbon emissions
  • Building design will support smaller learning communities
Cooley High School Project Budget $8,306,132
  • Evaluate whether portions of this historic design can be preserved, while reducing overall square footage from 321,000 to 150,000
  • Consider complete demolition and building a small, energy-efficient facility
  • Safety and security are essential
Denby High School Project Budget $24,819,339
  • Infrastructure improvements for heating, air quality, lighting and flooring
  • State-of-the-art security – inside and out
  • Modernize classrooms to create flexible learning spaces
Duffield PK-8 Project Budget $8,578,108
  • Energy efficiency and mechanical improvements
  • Create 21st century learning environment
  • Consider community partners to share some of surplus space and better serve social needs
Finney High School Project Budget $53,467,428
  • The campus will include a dual-use media center and pool
  • Geothermal alternative energy will create lower energy costs and reduced carbon emissions
  • Building design will support smaller learning communities
Ford High School Project Budget $20,594,893
  • Renovate the facility to address infrastructure deficiencies
  • Create 21st century classrooms with technology
  • Address security needs
  • Reduce overall building square footage to match
    enrollment trends and save money
JR King PK-8 Project Budget $15,896,250
  • Classroom upgrades to create 21st century learning opportunities
  • Mechanical upgrades and better air quality
  • Improved security and site improvements for the community
Marcus Garvey PK-8 Project Budget $11,271,996
  • Build on the Summer Rush project and continue the transformation of this building
  • Major pool renovation
  • Build a stronger interface with the adjacent Community Center Upgrade security
Mark Twain PK-8 Project Budget $8,597,281
  • Improve technology
  • Improve lighting and infrastructure
  • Address security needs
Martin Luther King, Jr. High School Project Budget $54,469,031
  • Replace the facility with state-of-the-art high school emphasizing S.T.E.M. curriculum
  • Address security needs
  • Energy efficiency and maintenance cost savings
Maybury PK-8 Project Budget $37,406,135
  • State-of-the-art technology and curricular improvements using DPS PreK-8 template
  • Gymnasium and media center for community use
  • Facility will incorporate energy efficiency and alternative fuels
McNair PK-8 Project Budget $21,979,291
  • The campus will include a dual-use media center
  • Geothermal alternative energy will create lower energy costs and reduced carbon emissions
  • Entire campus will be designed for improved security and traffic flow
Mumford High School Project Budget $54,746,160
  • Replace the facility with state-of-the-art high school
  • Alternative energy options may result in savings
  • Community use of pool, media center and athletics
Munger PK-8 (will become Chadsey PK-8) Project Budget $18,374,295
  • Construct 21st century educational facility using DPS PreK-8 template
  • Building design will support smaller learning facilities
  • Geothermal alternative energy will create lower energy cost and reduced carbon emissions
Northwestern High School Project Budget $26,870,380
  • Modernize or replace the facility to create flexible learning spaces
  • Infrastructure improvements for heating, air quality, lighting, technology and windows
  • Energy efficiency and mechanical improvements
Western International High School Project Budget $28,610,966
  • Infrastructure improvements for heating, air quality and lighting
  • State-of-the-art security – inside and out
  • Create a gymnasium and swimming pool which will serve as a community health club

Proposal S

A thank you from Robert Bobb

November 6, 2009

I want to extend my profound thanks to everyone who supported the passage of Proposal S.

This is a time of change for the City of Detroit, change away from the old methods and old solutions, from the old players and the old games, from regressing about everything that went wrong to marching forward together for the bright future of our city and its children.

We will now move forward quickly and aggressively to implement this $500.5 million bond, including eight new and ten modernized buildings. We will put the systems and people in place to ensure both strong oversight and first source programs aimed at hiring Detroiters on these projects. We will work closely with the City of Detroit to ensure that the process is streamlined and efficient at every point. We also plan to engage the community and work closely with our academic team to build schools that are driven by our academic plan.

We will never let the mistakes of the past happen again with the public’s precious resources intended to improve our children’s learning environments.

We now look forward to building and renovating schools to suit 21st-century learning needs and creating learning environments that our students certainly deserve.

Again, we thank all of you for supporting DPS. We could not have done this without all the hard work of the many volunteers who sought to do what is right for Detroit’s children.

Robert C. Bobb
Emergency Financial Manager for Detroit Public Schools

About Proposal S

Detroit Public Schools plans to build eight new schools and modernize 10 schools thanks to the passage of Proposal S, a bond referendum voters approved on Nov. 3 to take advantage of $500.5 million in stimulus dollars that President Barack Obama made available to build new schools and modernize existing schools.

The funds come to DPS in the form of no-interest and low-interest bonds available under economic stimulus packages. These dollars must be spent quickly—within 3 years. DPS received the 6th largest allocation of qualified school construction bonds in the country.

There is no tax increase from Proposal S. Taxes will remain the same.

Under Proposal S, $246 million — nearly half of the bonds — will be re-paid at a 0% interest rate.

The program also will stimulate the economy. According to the State of Michigan’s formula, Proposal S will create nearly 11,000 jobs and will result in $500.5 million being spent in Detroit neighborhoods within a 3-year period beginning in January 2010.

Proposal S will improve the district’s progress toward creating safe, new, state-of- the-art Centers of Excellence in Detroit neighborhoods and public schools. It is the district's goal that any Proposal S fund savings would be redirected to improve the safety, technology and quality of life in the district.

 

Resources

Proposal S

1994 Bond

Under the 1994 $1.5 Billion Bond Program, the District built 3 new High Schools, renovated 2 others, built 16 other new school buildings, in addition to providing over $600 million in capital improvements to over 175 schools within the District, including bathroom and kitchen upgrades, lighting and electrical improvements, athletic facilities and wiring for the internet.

 

Universal PreK-8 School Model

Detroit Public Schools is moving toward a universal PreK-8 school model. The Proposal S bond program will deliver 5 new and 5 renovated PreK-8 schools with in the next three years. These schools will follow a consolidated schools model that creates “academic centers” within a single school / campus. The centers will typically group administration, PreK – 5, academic support (media center, resource rooms), Arts and Athletics, and 6 – 8 into these separate but contiguous areas.

Model PreK-8 School
Typical configuration of these spaces and relationship between the centers.

Proposal S Frequently Asked Questions

What is a bond issue anyway?

A bond issue is a way to borrow money to finance capital projects. Capital projects include building new schools; school renovations such as new heating and cooling systems, electrical repairs, security provisions or window and floor replacement; and installing the latest education technology equipment in the classroom. Bond issues must be approved by voters.

What will the money from Proposal S be used for?

Financing from the passage of Proposal S will be used to build eight new schools and modernize 10 other schools. Schools that are modernized will be renovated with new heating, electrical and security systems and equipped with state-of-the-art technology. These projects can include:

  • Media centers
  • New heating systems
  • New plumbing and restrooms
  • New flooring, windows and lighting
  • Infrastructure improvements for air quality and lighting
  • Renovated swimming pools
  • Geothermal alternative energy to lower costs

If Proposal S is passed, will my taxes increase?

No. If voters approve Proposal S, there would be No tax increase. The current bond repayment millage, which is now scheduled to expire in 2033, would remain at the current level through 2039.

Will Proposal S create new jobs?

Yes. The state of Michigan estimates Proposal S will create nearly 11,000 new jobs in Metro Detroit, including 3,725 direct jobs and 7,000 indirect jobs. Direct jobs are those directly connected to each project, such as construction workers, painters and architects. Indirect jobs include jobs like truck drivers and restaurant workers.

Will any provisions be put in place to make sure Detroiters get jobs if Proposal S is passed?

Yes. The bond program will include Local/Small Local Business Enterprise programs and incentives such as First Source programs to encourage hiring Detroiters and mentoring and student employment programs to train a new generation of construction professionals.

Why can’t we use this $500.5 million to eliminate DPS’ deficit?

Money from a bond referendum can only be used for capital projects. It cannot be used to reduce debt.

Why will some neighborhoods get new or modernized schools and others will not?

The 18 schools selected for the bond project were chosen based on a number of criteria including number of students, how much of the building is used and the condition of the building or the cost to keep the building a first-class school. Schools that met these criteria were considered for renovation or rebuilding.

What about schools that are not on the list?

Savings from the project budgets will be used to support a district-wide security initiative, which will include:

  • Interior and exterior digital cameras
  • Updated alarm systems
  • Keyless entry
  • Campus perimeter fencing

It will also be used for technology upgrades in the classrooms, such as Smartboards and creating access to the Internet.

What interest rate will DPS get on the $500.5 million bonds?

Nearly half of the bonds, $246.5 million, will be repaid at a 0% interest rate. The remainder, $254 million, will be repaid at a 0 to 2% interest rate. Both rates are far below what DPS would receive if it attempted to sell bonds on its own at this time.

How were the funds from the 1994 Bond Proposal used?

A full report on the 1994 Bond Proposal and the use of funds is available at detroitk12.org/ProposalS.

Is there an oversight committee planned for Proposal S?

DPS Emergency Financial Manager Robert Bobb will establish an oversight committee of respected community leaders that will review every aspect of ongoing construction and funding. The DPS Bond Advisory and Fiscal Responsibility Committee will include parents, as well as government, industry, labor and community leaders who are committed to ensuring that the project has proper accountability and oversight.

What else is the district doing to secure funding?

Detroit Public Schools has aggressively pursued more than $800 million available in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus funds for K-12 school systems.

What Will I See on the Ballot?

 

Download Proposal S Brochure