Get creative at the Detroit Public Library

Do you know a middle school student interested in art? Share this news: The Detroit Public Library – Redford Branch will host free art classes every Saturday from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. The workshops, hosted by College for Creative Studies, will help students prepare their personal art portfolio and encourage them to apply to Detroit’s high school art programs. For more information, call the Redford Branch at 313-481-1820.

Visit detroitpubliclibrary.org/calendar for a full list of fun, family events!

 

Robots in the real world

The students at Cooke STEM Academy are learning to work together to build and program robots! The Cooke robotics team, consisting of students in grades 3-6, uses the Lego Mindstorm kit and iPad coding program to assemble and program the machines under the direction of a community volunteer and Bosch engineer. Students are developing critical thinking, problem solving, and engineering skills as they build, manipulate and troubleshoot their team robots.

“They also have discussions and video lessons about real world usage of robotics such as Amazon’s packing and shipping process and how robots can impact productivity,” said Karlyn Singleton GNA for Cooke STEM. “The team is excited about their first year entry in the DPSCD sponsored robotics competitions.”

Every school day counts – and good attendance pays off

Attendance counts at Priest Elementary-Middle School and the students understand how their attendance can impact their learning. Thanks to the concentrated efforts of the Community in School Leaders and the PBIS Team, 90 students in grades 2-5 with perfect attendance during the month of October were able to go to a University of Detroit women’s basketball game at Calihan Hall.

“The students had a blast and were encouraged to continue their perfect attendance in the future,” says Priest Teacher Amber Lawson. “Students with consistent attendance are more likely to be successful academically.”

Munger Leads When Munger Reads Early Childhood and Early Literacy Program Pilot to Kick off in January 2018

New Hybrid Literacy Program is a collaboration of local, regional and state-wide partners and resources – more than $20,000 donated to start program.

DETROIT – December 19, 2017 – Detroit Public Schools Community District’s Munger Elementary-Middle School and community partners are launching a pilot program for families and students to address early childhood challenges with resources ranging from prenatal care to critical developmental tools for children ages 0 to 3, and preschoolers through third grade – with an ultimate goal of increasing literacy proficiency.

“This is a great opportunity to provide professional development for teachers and support services team members to increase reading comprehension and proficiency. This program is for families and students, we are certain to unlock students’ full potential. It is also directly aligned with the District’s whole child commitment identified in our Blueprint to move DPSCD forward,” said Sharlonda Buckman, DPSCD, Sr. Executive Director of Family and Community Engagement. “Based on what we learn, we will use the data to support our efforts across other schools in the District.”

Through the generous financial support of Paul and Amy Blavin, Brilliant Detroit will become a Raising a Reader affiliate and Raising a Reader will be incorporated into the services and programming. This program targets both children and parents in literacy efforts.

 

Munger Leads when Munger Reads will kick off in January at Munger Elementary-Middle School and its surrounding neighborhood. This pilot program establishes a collaboration of existing community organizations and resources along with Munger school staff to provide a hybrid model of additional support to 100 families and approximately 80 volunteers.

“Language development and literacy are the building blocks for children to learn, grow and succeed,” said Justice Maura Corrigan, Counsel, Butzel Long and Former Director of the Michigan Department of Human Services and Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court (retired).  “The Detroit Public Schools Community Districts’ Munger Leads when Munger Reads pilot program, together with Raising a Reader, is an important step to link language development in babies ages 0 to 3, with preschoolers through third graders.  When provided the tools, children in poverty with support from their parents and teachers can learn to read.  As a partner, I am delighted to provide guidance and support to this innovative program in the Munger neighborhood and beyond.”

The overarching goals of the Munger Leads when Munger Reads pilot are to:

  • Create a literacy-focused community in the Munger neighborhood.
  • Provide parents with information and strategies to strengthen language skills in their children.
  • Language skills are the foundation of literacy skills.
  • Ensure children possess grade level readiness when they enter Kindergarten at Munger.
  • Empower parents to teach, talk, read, and play with their children every day.

Great Start Collaborative Wayne will provide training for parents and community members and will also coordinate a neighborhood-wide language and literacy campaign.

Brilliant Detroit will also host community programming and parent support and training classes. The Nurse Family Partnership program through Authority Health

is a partner in the pilot and the families involved in this home visiting program will also be part of the Raising a Reader initiative.

Wayne RESA is a proud partner working with Detroit Public School Community District and families to best prepare young children for success in school and in life. The Great Start Readiness Program is Michigan’s state-funded preschool program for four-year-old children with factors which may place them at risk of educational failure. Together we are committed to leadership through service and collaboration for excellence in teaching and learning for all.  Munger houses four Great Start Readiness Program classrooms serving 72 children and families.

Within Munger, the principal, assistant principal, staff, and parent network were instrumental in developing the framework for support at the school. The District will provide additional support for Munger’s teacher training initiative. Additional support includes tutoring for students, English as a Second Language classes for parents, volunteers to assist with the school’s existing attendance and parent engagement programs, afterschool programs and clubs. Evaluation and tracking of Munger Leads when Munger Reads will be performed by a workgroup consisting of Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan, Brilliant Detroit and DPSCD.

“The success of our children really depends on a community-wide approach to education, starting with early childhood learning. The Munger Leads when Munger Reads pilot program is an excellent example of a wide range of support systems coming together in a focused way that I hope to see replicated across our city,” said Mayor Mike Duggan.

Munger Leads when Munger Reads subgroup partners include: DPSCD Munger Elementary-Middle School staff and Parent Teacher Association; Great Start Collaborative Wayne; United Way of Southeastern Michigan; Authority Health – Nurse Family Partnership program; Henry Ford Health System; Wayne RESA; Southwest Solutions; Brilliant Detroit; Business United with Officers and Youth within the 4th Precinct of the Detroit Police Department; Detroit Fire Department Ladder 22; Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan; Michigan Department of Health and Human Services – Pathways to Potential and Field Operations Administration; City of Detroit Office of Neighborhood Revitalization, District 6; Grosse Ile Presbyterian Church; Office of Governor Rick Snyder; Maura Corrigan; Paul and Amy Blavin; and Wayne County Commissioner Ilona Varga.

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Master Teachers – Call for Applicants

Leading from the Classroom

If we are to realize the kind of improvement we hope to achieve as a district, we must leverage the talent and determination of our teachers and give them opportunities to serve as deeply trained and empowered instructional leaders. By introducing a Master Teacher role that allows outstanding teachers to remain in their classrooms while developing their skills as leaders, we will we retain and elevate our best, and help improve the performance of all.

The Role

A Master Teacher is an exceptional practitioner who leads from the classroom and cultivates their peers’ ability to deliver excellent instruction and increase student achievement. Master Teachers are not administrators, nor do they take on administrative roles. Instead, they teach students half of the day to model best practices and generate useful materials for their school, such as exemplar lessons and student work samples. The other half of the day, they provide a range of support to their peers, such as leading 1-on-1 observation and coaching, facilitating collaborative time, co-planning with small teams, mentoring new or student teachers, or even modeling in other teachers’ classrooms.
The goal of a Master Teacher is to improve a team of teachers’ abilities to effectively plan for and deliver high-quality instruction in pursuit of better outcomes for students. By creating distributive leadership structures in schools, Master Teachers —in collaboration with school leaders—will increase opportunities for feedback and growth to drive increased student achievement, while building their own capacity as leaders.
Master Teacher roles will be available in literacy and mathematics, K-12, and all Master Teachers will earn a stipend of $5,000 annually.

The Application

To become a Master Teacher for next school year, candidates must first gain acceptance into an eligibility pool for hire. Candidates will submit a detailed lesson plan and aligned student work, a statement of interest and resumé, and a formal letter of recommendation from an administrator or peer at their school. These materials will be reviewed by a selection committee of senior district leaders, principals, and representatives from the Detroit Federation of Teachers. Candidates with the highest potential to thrive based on the application will enter an eligibility pool for hire by our schools. At the school level, principals will convene a selection committee of at least two teachers and members of their leadership team to interview eligible candidates and find the best fit for their school community.

The Value

Participating educators will receive more than just a stipend for taking on this leadership role. The district will make a true investment in all Master Educators. In addition to access to content and pedagogical professional development that will allow them to hone their craft and model for others, Master Teachers will participate in specialized training on the skills and strategies necessary to lead adults successfully, including designing and facilitating adult learning and collaboration, coaching, managing conflict, and leading for equity.

Qualifications

Teaching Experience
At least 3 years of successful teaching experience
Certification
Valid certification in the subject area he or she will support
Effectiveness
Highly Effective or Effective Ratings (or equivalent) in each of the last three school years

Deadlines

First application deadline
January 2, 2018
Second application deadline
February 2, 2018

Apply today

Frequently Asked Questions

Are only math and literacy teachers eligible to be a Master Teacher?
For 2018-19, Master Teachers will support K-12 math and literacy only, though we may explore adding additional subject areas in future years. Any teacher that has valid certification in K-12 math or literacy, whether they are currently teaching those subjects or not, is eligible to apply.
Will Master Teachers only teach the subject they are supporting?
In K-5 settings where teachers typically teach all subject areas, Literacy Master Teachers will lead Literacy and Social Studies instruction, and Mathematics Master Teachers will lead Mathematics and Science instruction. In settings where teachers are departmentalized, Master Teachers will typically only teach one subject, often at multiple grade levels.
What should I prepare before I start my online application?
Before you begin your application, we suggest that you do the following pre-work:

  1. Confirm that you meet the eligibility requirements for the role (outlined in the Qualifications section on the reverse).
  2. Gather a recent lesson plan (from the 2017-18 school year) and at least 5 samples of student work generated during that lesson save them on your computer using the following naming convention: YOURLASTNAME_YOURFIRSTNAME_LessonPlan, YOURLASTNAME_YOURFIRSTNAME_StudentWork
  3. Update your resume and save it using the following naming convention: YOURLASTNAME_YOURFIRSTNAME_resume.
  4. Prepare a brief (500 word) statement of interest describing why you want to become a Master Teacher
  5. Identify a current colleague or administrator to serve as your reference. Ask them to send you a brief letter of recommendation for the role. Once you receive the letter, save it using the following naming convention: YOURLASTNAME_YOURFIRSTNAME_recommendation.
  6. Determine if you wish to be considered for the Superintendent’s Fellowship.
What is the Superintendent’s Fellowship?
The Fellowship is a unique leadership opportunity for a subset of teachers accepted into the eligibility pool. Two candidates per grade level, one for math and one for literacy, will be selected to take part in this group. These Fellows will embark on a signature experience that develops them as practitioners and leaders. The experience will begin with a celebratory induction into the Fellowship, including recognition from local dignitaries and a chance to network with senior district and community leaders. Induction will be quickly followed by a transformative professional learning experience at the UnboundEd Standards Institute in Los Angeles, CA. There, Fellows will spend a week in deep study of the Common Core Standards and strong instructional materials and be given time to network with other motivated educators from around the country. Attendance at the UnboundEd Standards Institute (January 28-February 2), as well as a willingness to participate and lead at events during the 2017-18 school year, such as curriculum review committees, is required to participate as a Fellow.
When are applications due?
Any candidate who would like to be considered for the Superintendent’s Fellowship must submit their application by midnight on January 2, 2018. Candidates who would like to be considered for the eligibility pool, but do not wish to apply for the Superintendent’s Fellowship, may apply using the second deadline: midnight on February 2, 2018.
What happens after I submit my application?
Your materials will be reviewed by a selection committee of senior district leaders, principals, and representatives from the Detroit Federation of Teachers. Candidates with solid initial applications will be invited to a panel interview where they will share their work on a brief candidate project and answer a standardized set of questions from the panel. The interviewees who demonstrate the highest potential to thrive will enter an eligibility pool for hire by our schools. To select Master Teachers, Principals will convene a selection committee, including their leadership team and at least two teachers, to screen eligible candidates and find the best fit for their school community.
What if I am selected for the Fellowship, but I cannot attend the UnboundEd Institute?
Unfortunately, only candidates who can attend the Institute will be able to take part in the Fellowship. However, you will still be invited to join the general eligibility pool for schools to consider as they select their Master Teachers.
If I am hired by a school, are there other requirements I will need to fulfill?
By signing up to be a Master Teacher, you are signing up to lead – and to grow. That’s why to earn your Master Teacher stipend and serve in the role, you will be required to take part in initial and ongoing leadership development. In summer 2018, you will be required to attend no more than 5 days of initial training, which will feature expert sessions on instructional leadership, content, pedagogy, and adult facilitation to jump start your success in the role. During the school year, you will also be required to attend monthly professional development, no more than 10 hours of professional development per month outside of the contract hours. Applicants accepted into the eligibility pool will learn more information following their admittance.
Who can I contact if I have further questions?
We have a dedicated email address to handle all inquiries. Please contact master.teacher@detroitk12.org.

Fisher Lower Magnet receives a literacy lounge makeover

The students at Fisher Magnet Lower Academy will enjoy more than 650 new books in their renovated Literacy Lounge! The Detroit Pistons, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Chassix donated books, bookshelves and murals to create a fun, relaxing, learning environment for our students. The students welcomed player Reggie Jackson with cheers and pom-poms and followed him into the lounge for the official grand opening celebration and story time. Thank you to our partners for creating this literacy space for our students to learn!

Bus takes students shopping to fulfill wish lists

More than 300 DPSCD students were picked up from their homes Saturday by ABC Student Transportation and were transported to Walmart in Livonia to participate in the 2017 Holiday Shopping Experience. Each student was assigned a personal shopper to take them through the store and purchase $100 worth of items from their wish lists. More than 150 volunteers participated on this special day and students expressed their gratitude for this special event.  The DPSCD Office of Student Transportation would like to thank ABC Student Transportation for their generosity and giving back to the students of DPSCD!

Coding continues at Gompers

Students at Gompers Elementary-Middle School participated in the QSTEM program through a partnership with the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP) and Quicken Loans last month. The middle school students engaged in exciting, hands-on educational technology programming including coding software and constructing hardware. Educational activities outside of the classroom allow students to see first-hand the opportunities that stem from excelling in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“This program inspired students to pursue further education and experience STEM career paths,” said Deana Kolomjec, Good News Ambassador for Gompers.

Love and kindness is a universal trait

John R. King and Performing Arts Academy students were eager to experience The Ned Show Assembly, a presentation about cultural differences and acceptance of others.  The assembly theme, kindness and acceptance, taught students how to get along with people of all backgrounds, who may dress or speak differently or have disabilities. They learned people are all the same when it comes to internal feelings.

“Kindness is the adventure everyone needs in their daily lives,” says Wendell Sherley, counselor at John R. King. “This one-hour presentation has broadened our students’ expectations.”

Robots in the real world

The students at Cooke STEM Academy are learning to work together to build and program robots! The Cooke robotics team, consisting of students in grades 3-6, uses the Lego Mindstorm kit and iPad coding program to assemble and program the machines under the direction of a community volunteer and Bosch engineer. Students are developing critical thinking, problem solving, and engineering skills as they build, manipulate and troubleshoot their team robots.

“They also have discussions and video lessons about real world usage of robotics such as Amazon’s packing and shipping process and how robots can impact productivity,” said Karlyn Singleton GNA for Cooke STEM. “The team is excited about their first year entry in the DPSCD sponsored robotics competitions.”