Achievement

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Detroit Public Schools is announcing a comprehensive transformation aimed at improving academics and creating a more efficient system of high-performing schools for all DPS students. By doing so early, much earlier than has traditionally been the case in Detroit, parents can make plans for enrollment and also seek information about their children’s schools.

This is a critically important time in the history of Detroit Public Schools and for the City of Detroit. Emergency Manager Roy S. Roberts has stated frequently that Detroit Public Schools must not only be a part of Detroit’s comeback, it must LEAD it. DPS has been using an outdated educational model that must be discarded. The district must embark on a bold and ambitious journey that we believe will return the City to its rightful place as the world class leader in public education, a position it once held.

The announcement includes the following:

  • Due to declining enrollment and shifting demographics, there are currently 69,616 students, preK-12th grade, in a district with seats for 110,660 students. The vacant seats, taken together, represent what would be equivalent to the second largest school district in the state. And,  future trends call for continued reduction in school-age population. Rather than continue to support buildings that are far under-utilized, we will close, consolidate and merge schools, allowing us to drive additional resources to a smaller group of higher-quality facilities and to our students in those buildings.
  • 15 historically low-performing schools will be placed in the new Education Achievement Authority of Michigan, where they will be wrapped in additional resources and given greater autonomy to succeed. The schools selected are among the 5 percent of schools that ranked lowest in the state for achievement.
  • DPS will open four additional brand new buildings for the fall as part of the district’s bond construction project, which will allow us to consolidate 7 outdated buildings so that 4,500 children may start the year in state-of-the-art facilities designed for 21st century learning. These four schools represent  $150 million in educational investments thanks to Detroit voters. Already, some 10,000 Detroit students are learning every day inside new or renovated buildings opened this past year through this program.

While we know that transition is difficult, we are doing everything possible to ensure a smooth start of the school year by starting this process now.

A new Open Enrollment period for families will be held from March 15 – April 16 to allow for important decisions to be made. DPS application schools will participate in an earlier application period from February 20 – March 15.

Wrapping up the school assignments for current students early will allow for staffing and budgeting decisions to be made on a timely basis, to ensure a smooth start to the new school year including the placement of a teacher in front of every child on the first day of school.

Most importantly, through this transition plan, we are doing everything possible to ensure that all children in Detroit Public Schools have the opportunity to succeed at the highest levels and direct resources where they are needed most.  Together we will make Detroit Public Schools the best system of quality schools of any city in the nation.

We will continue to keep parents informed.

The following schools are part of the transformation:

 

 

New Construction

Finney High School

Finney High School Letter to Parents

While the current school building will close, a new $46.5 million, 221,000-square-foot high school is being constructed at the site of the former Finney High School. The new school, which will feature, eight science laboratories, a high-tech media center, a performing arts section, and an athletic complex with a community health clinic, will be named East English Village Preparatory Academy and will accommodate up to 1,200 students. Students in grades 10-12 from Finney and Crockett high schools will attend the new building. All incoming 9thgrade students must complete an application to attend, hold a minimum 2.5 grade point average, and undergo an interview with the Admissions Committee. Applicants must have a strong interest in one of the EEVPA career pathways including:

  • Career and Technical Education with a focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Career pathways under this program include:
    • Business Management, Marketing and Technology
    • Heath Sciences
    • Engineering/Management and Industrial Technology
  • Middle College
    • Middle College students will have the unique opportunity to take college courses while they are in high school.
    • Students who complete the program can earn an Associate’s Degree or enter a four-year university as a sophomore or junior depending on the amount of credit hours they complete.
  • Fine & Performing Arts career pathways include:
    • Instrumental Music
    • Theater Arts
    • Choral Music
    • Dance
    • Visual Arts

The facility will include eight science laboratories, a high-tech media center, a performing arts section, and an athletic complex with a community health clinic. Special programs will include a Summer Bridge Program for all incoming 9th graders; a double dose of English and Mathematics for all 9th and 10th graders; ACT preparation courses and more.  The new school stadium will have a multi-seasonal, synthetic field for track, football, soccer and other athletic programs. East English Village Preparatory Academy is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

Crockett High School

Crockett High School Letter to Parents

While the current school building will close, a new $46.5 million, 221,000-square-foot high school is being constructed at the site of the former Finney High School. The new school, which will feature, eight science laboratories, a high-tech media center, a performing arts section, and an athletic complex with a community health clinic, will be named East English Village Preparatory Academy and will accommodate up to 1,200 students. Students in grades 10-12 from Finney and Crockett high schools will attend the new building. All incoming 9th grade students must complete an application to attend, hold a minimum 2.5 grade point average, and undergo an interview with the Admissions Committee. Applicants must have a strong interest in one of the EEVPA career pathways including:

  • Career and Technical Education with a focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Career pathways under this program include:
    • Business Management, Marketing and Technology
    • Heath Sciences
    • Engineering/Management and Industrial Technology
  • Middle College
    • Middle College students will have the unique opportunity to take college courses while they are in high school.
    • Students who complete the program can earn an Associate’s Degree or enter a four-year university as a sophomore or junior depending on the amount of credit hours they complete.
  • Fine & Performing Arts career pathways include:
    • Instrumental Music
    • Theater Arts
    • Choral Music
    • Dance
    • Visual Arts

The facility will include eight science laboratories, a high-tech media center, a performing arts section, and an athletic complex with a community health clinic. Special programs will include a Summer Bridge Program for all incoming 9th graders; a double dose of English and Mathematics for all 9th and 10th graders; ACT preparation courses and more.  The new school stadium will have a multi-seasonal, synthetic field for track, football, soccer and other athletic programs. East English Village Preparatory Academy is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

O.W. Holmes Elementary-Middle School

O.W. Holmes Elementary-Middle School Letter to Parents

New Munger PreK-8 School

Students will be reassigned to the new $22.3 million Munger PreK-8 School, which will accommodate 850 students. This site includes a two-story “student arcade” that will function as a dining court, student center and school square. Bright, sustainable classrooms will line colorful corridors centered around an academic commons area and teacher work centers. The new school is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

Logan Elementary School

Logan Elementary School Letter to Parents

Students will be reassigned to the new $22.3 million Munger PreK-8 School, which will accommodate 850 students. This site includes a two-story “student arcade” that will function as a dining court, student center and school square. Bright, sustainable classrooms will line colorful corridors centered around an academic commons area and teacher work centers. The new school is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

Parker Elementary-Middle School

Parker Elementary-Middle School Letter to Parents

Students will be reassigned to the new $21.8 million Mackenzie PreK-8 School, which will include a large open media center serving the needs of the school’s middle and elementary students. The building design will focus on student safety and will be environmentally responsible. Bright, sustainable classrooms will line colorful corridors centered around an academic commons area and teacher work centers. The new school is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

Barton Elementary School

Barton Elementary School Letter to Parents

Students will be reassigned to the new $21.8 million Mackenzie PreK- 8 School, which will include a large open media center serving the needs of the school’s middle and elementary students. The building design will focus on student safety and will be environmentally responsible. Bright, sustainable classrooms will line colorful corridors centered around an academic commons area and teacher work centers. The new school is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

Mumford High School

Mumford High School Letter to Parents

While the current school building will close, the new $50.3 million Mumford High School is the largest school construction project in the district’s bond program. Planned to accommodate more than 1,500 students, the new 239,900-square-foot high school will be a LEED Silver Certified state-of-the-art facility. The building will offer academic core areas, a high-tech media center, modern science laboratories, and a community health clinic. The school will be built on the current athletic field. The new school is among the 18 new or renovated schools that are part of the $500.5 million DPS Capital Improvement Program.

 

New Charter Schools

Detroit Public Schools’ MacDowell and Rutherford elementary schools will be converted to charter schools that will open this fall, as part of a plan to raise academic achievement while keeping neighborhood schools open.

Detroit Public Schools will be the authorizer for the new schools and will hold them accountable for meeting student achievement goals and complying with DPS requirements, as well as state and federal law.

Following an intensive selection process, Solid Rock Management Company was selected to run Rutherford Elementary and SABIS Educational Systems, Inc., was selected to operate MacDowell Elementary School.

Rutherford Parent Letter

MacDowell Parent Letter

Charter Conversions: Frequently Asked Questions

The Rutherford community is invited to a meet-and-greet with Solid Rock’s team at the school at 6 p.m. Thursday March 22

The MacDowell community is invited to a meet-and-greet event with SABIS’ team at the school at 7 p.m. Monday March 26.

Cooke Elementary and Noble Elementary, which were candidates for conversion, will not be converted this year and will remain open as DPS schools.

About Solid Rock management Company

Solid Rock Management Company, founded by Marvin L. Winans, has managed award-winning schools in Detroit for 15 years. The company serves more than 1,100 students in grades K-12 on two campuses.

Solid Rock schools have been recognized for their academic excellence by the Skillman Foundation’s Good Schools initiative and have produced a Gates Millennium Scholarship recipient, as well as many other full scholarship recipients.

Students from Marvin L. Winans Academy for Performing Arts have won numerous awards across the nation for their participation in Vocal and Orchestral competitions. Winans Academy students have performed at the Vatican in Rome and have gone on to attend colleges and universities across the nation, including Ivy League schools, Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other institutions of higher learning.

About Sabis Educational Systems

SABIS® Educational Systems, Inc. is a global education management organization that has a long tradition of making a difference through education.  With a network of schools in the U.S. in the private and public sectors, SABIS® has a proven track record of bringing value to individual students through the proprietary SABIS® Educational System, including nearly 1,400 students in Michigan.

The International Academy of Flint, operated by SABIS, has graduated 100 percent of its 12th graders for the past seven years.  The school has been named as one of the country’s top performing high schools by U.S. News & World Report.  It has been named as a “Charter School of Excellence” by the Michigan Association of Public Charter School Academies as well as recognized by the Michigan Department of Education for “Beating the Odds.”

The International Academy of Saginaw (IAS), established in 2007, has enjoyed similar accolades, earning the distinction of “Top-Performing Michigan Public Charter School” and most recently being named as “Academic State Champion” by Bridge Magazine for its performance on the Grade 4 MEAP exam.

About Detroit Public Schools Office of Charter Schools

Detroit Public Schools is one of the largest authorizers of charter schools in the city of Detroit. The district currently authorizes 14 schools that serve more than 4,000 students in a variety of settings from kindergarten through high school. The district’s portfolio includes five former DPS schools that were converted to charter schools last fall.

Charter schools are public schools that are required to hire certified teachers, accept all students regardless of ability, administer the MEAP and MME and otherwise abide by the same laws required of traditional schools in Michigan.

A charter school authorizer since 1998, Detroit Public Schools issues contracts with charter schools and monitors them to ensure they are financially sound, meet their academic goals and follow state and federal requirements.

The mission of the Detroit Public Schools Office of Charter Schools is to authorize high-performing charter schools in Detroit, support them, and hold them accountable for compliance with the law and putting their students on a path to high school graduation and college enrollment.

The companies that were selected will be required to:

  • Locate their school facility within the school boundaries of the school they are replacing or leasing the facility of the DPS school they will be replacing.
  • Provide bus transportation to those students who reside in the former DPS boundaries for that school and live more than ¾ of a mile from the school.
  • Selecting the principal and teachers for the school.

 

Closures / Consolidations

Detroit Day School for the Deaf

Detroit Day School for the Deaf Letter to Parents

While the program will close, students will be reassigned to schools with hearing impaired programs including: Schulze, Davison and Bunche schools (existing programs) and the brand new Munger PK-8 (new school). Currently, DSD has an enrollment of only 36 students. DPS already serves 102 deaf and hearing-impaired students in other facilities. This transition supports Detroit Public Schools and federal inclusion goals and will give Detroit Day students real-world practical experience with hearing students.

 

Detroit City High School

Detroit City High School Letter to Parents

While the program and building will close, students will be reassigned to schools with existing Second Chance Programs including: Southeastern, Denby, Northwestern, Cody, and the brand new Mumford High School; West Side Academy Alternative High School; and other neighborhood high schools. Currently, DCHS has an enrollment of only 229 students in a building with capacity for nearly 1,000 students. Less than 1 percent of the students are proficient in mathematics, and only 8 percent are proficient in English-Language Arts. This transition will improve student learning and reduce administrative and operational costs to the district.

 

Mae C. Jemison Academy

Mae C. Jemison Academy Letter to Parents

While the program and building will close, students will be reassigned to Gardner Elementary School or Henderson Academy, depending on the student’s address and grade level. Henderson Academy will be renamed Henderson-Jemison Academy. Mae C. Jemison Academy is ranked as one of the lowest performing 5 percent of state schools. The current enrollment is only 474 students in a building with capacity for 1,200.  Among all DPS facilities, Mae C. Jemison is ranked as the 12th lowest with an immediate need for window and roof replacements totaling over $1.7 million. This transition will improve student learning and reduce administrative and operational costs to the district.

 

Kettering High School & Kettering West Wing

Kettering High School & Kettering West Wing Letter to Parents

While the program and building will close, students at Kettering High School will be reassigned to Denby, Pershing, Southeastern, or Martin Luther King, Jr. high schools. Students enrolled at Kettering West Wing will be reassigned to schools with existing special education programs including Southeastern High School; Jerry L. White Center; Charles R. Drew Transition Center; or the new East English Village Preparatory Academy currently being constructed on the former Finney High School site.  Kettering High School & Kettering West Wing are ranked among the lowest performing 5 percent of state schools. Currently, the facility has an enrollment of 930 students in a building with capacity for over 1,800 students. Kettering is the lowest rated DPS facility with an immediate need for roof, window and HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) replacements totaling more than $5 million. This transition will improve student learning and reduce administrative and operational costs to the district.

 

Ludington Magnet Middle School

Ludington Magnet Middle School Letter to Parents

Only the Ludington building will close. The Ludington 5-8 Program will relocate to, and replace, Langston Hughes Academy.  The new school will be named Ludington Middle School and will house two programs: the Ludington Application Program and the Neighborhood 5-8 Program. The new school will have one principal. This transition will reduce administrative and operational costs to the district as the Ludington building is in need of new windows, estimated to cost $1.1 million; houses a very small gymnasium; and has no separate lunch room. Langston Hughes Academy has a new roof, lighting and flooring; houses a large gymnasium with a separate cafeteria; and has mechanical upgrades. The combined enrollment of both schools is 740 students, which will allow the building to be utilized more efficiently as the current Langston Hughes site has a capacity of 800.

 

Mason Elementary School

Mason Elementary School Letter to Parents

While the building will close, all students currently enrolled at Mason Elementary School will be offered enrollment at Farwell Elementary-Middle School. New students residing in the Mason Elementary School boundary will be assigned to either Farwell Elementary-Middle School or Nolan Elementary-Middle School, depending on the student’s address. Farwell will be renamed Mason Elementary-Middle School. In the last five years, Mason lost 13 percent of its enrollment and is projected to lose another 29 percent in the next five years. Among all DPS facilities, Mason Elementary School is the 14th lowest ranked building. Nolan and Farwell are the two better buildings in this area and are well-suited for the DPS PreK-8 academic model. The successful Mason academic program will benefit the lower performing Farwell program. In addition to the academic benefits of this transition, Mason, Nolan and Farwell schools are all located within a two-mile radius and have a combined 1,000 empty seats. Therefore, only two schools are needed in this area of declining population.

 

Robeson Early Learning Center

Robeson Early Learning Center Letter to Parents

While the school building will close, kindergarten classrooms at Robeson Early Learning Center will be reassigned to the main Paul Robeson, Malcolm X Academy building. All Pre-K programs will relocate to Palmer Park Preparatory Academy, which has a surplus Pre-K capacity. This transition will reduce administrative and facility costs to the district by consolidating the Paul Robeson, Malcolm X Academy program into one building. It will also bring greater efficiency for Pre-K programs by consolidating at Palmer Park Preparatory Academy.

 

Southwestern High School

Southwestern High School Letter to Parents

While the program and building will close, students will be reassigned to either Western or Northwestern high schools, depending on the student’s address. Southwestern High School is ranked in the lowest performing 5 percent of state schools. The program has lost more than 27 percent of its enrollment since 2009 and is expected to lose at least 31 percent over the next five years. Southwestern currently has only 583 students enrolled, who can be more efficiently accommodated at Western High School—with 800 empty seats—or Northwestern High School, which has 1,000 empty seats. This transition will improve student learning and reduce administrative and operational costs to the district.

 

Langston Hughes Academy

Langston Hughes Academy Letter to Parents

The high-achieving Ludington 5-8 Program will relocate to, and replace, Langston Hughes Academy.  The new school will be named Ludington Middle School and will house two programs: the Ludington Application Program and the Neighborhood 5-8 Program. All current students at Langston Hughes will remain. The new school will have one principal. This transition will reduce administrative and operational costs to the district as the Ludington building is in need of new windows, estimated to cost $1.1 million; houses a very small gymnasium; and has no separate lunch room. Langston Hughes Academy has a new roof, lighting and flooring; houses a large gymnasium with a separate cafeteria; and has mechanical upgrades. The combined enrollment of both schools is 740 students, which will allow the building to be utilized more efficiently as the current Langston Hughes site has a capacity of 800.

 

Farwell Elementary-Middle School

Farwell Elementary-Middle School Letter to Parents

Farwell will be renamed Mason Elementary-Middle School. The successful Mason academic program will benefit the lower performing Farwell program. The current Mason Elementary School building will close, and all students currently enrolled at Mason will be offered enrollment at the new site. All current students at Farwell will remain. New students residing in the Mason Elementary School boundary will be assigned to either Farwell Elementary-Middle School or Nolan Elementary-Middle School, depending on the student’s address. Farwell is a better building than the current Mason and is well-suited for the DPS PreK-8 academic model.  In addition to the academic benefits of this transition, Mason, Nolan and Farwell schools are all located within a two-mile radius and have a combined 1,000 empty seats. Therefore, only two schools are needed in this area of declining population.


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