New cradle-to-career educational partnership to serve more than 1,000 Detroit children on Marygrove campus

  • $50 million commitment from Kresge puts education at the center of community revitalization efforts in the Livernois-McNichols district; largest-ever philanthropic investment into a single Detroit neighborhood.
  • P-20 campus at Marygrove brings together exemplary early childhood, pre-K-12, post-secondary and graduate education in “cradle-to-career” continuum. One of few programs in the nation.
  • Partnership to serve roughly 1,000 Detroit children at full capacity in 2029; ninth grade begins 2019, kindergarten and pre-K in 2020.
  • New DPSCD K-12 program is in collaboration with the U-M School of Education; innovative approach to preparing newly certified teachers modeled on residency for medical doctors.
  • New early childhood center to be built on campus, to open 2020 (also to house kindergarten).
  • Starfish, DPSCD and the U-M SOE will co-design the early childhood education curriculum, catered to the whole-child and family servicing to children ages birth through 5.
  • Former Bates Academy and portions of Liberal Arts Building to be renovated for student and faculty use.
  • Early childhood center to use “hub and spoke” model to support existing early childhood facilities in area.
  • P-20 partnership builds on 90-year legacy of Marygrove College.

DETROIT – Organizations gathered at the Marygrove College campus today to announce a new cradle-to-career educational partnership including a state-of-the-art early childhood education center, a new K-12 school and the introduction of an innovative teacher education training modeled after hospital residency programs.

The P-20 Partnership – one of the first in the nation – is backed with a $50 million commitment from The Kresge Foundation, marking the largest philanthropic investment in history into a Detroit neighborhood. The investment places education at the center of community revitalization efforts in the Livernois-McNichols district in northwest Detroit.

In addition to construction of a new early childhood education center, the Kresge commitment will renovate the former Bates Academy (originally Immaculata High School) on the Marygrove campus to house the K-12 school and will renovate space within the college’s Liberal Arts Building for student and faculty use.

This landmark cradle-to-career educational campus – which will offer pre-K through graduate school studies with wrap-around services and community programs – is being jointly developed through a partnership including Kresge, the University of Michigan School of Education (U-M SOE), Detroit Public Schools Community District (DPSCD), the Marygrove Conservancy, Marygrove College, Starfish Family Services, IFF and the Detroit Collaborative Design Center of the University of Detroit Mercy.

At full capacity, the new state-of-the-art early childhood education center (operated by Starfish) and the K-12 school (operated by DPSCD) are projected to serve more than 1,000 Detroit children and their families, primarily focused on the surrounding neighborhoods in the Livernois-McNichols district.

The campus will also offer degree and professional certifications for teacher education students of the U-M SOE and graduate students of Marygrove College, respectively. A new teacher “residency program,” offered by U-M SOE will place undergraduate and graduate student teachers at the DPSCD school. When they complete their degrees, they will work at the school as supervised resident teachers in an innovative program modeled after the way doctors are trained.

The first phase of the campus will include a ninth-grade pilot program to open in 2019, followed by the opening of the early childhood education center and kindergarten in fall 2020. Successive grades will be added each year, and by 2029, all grades will be offered, alongside undergraduate and graduate studies and professional development courses and certifications.

“Community development isn’t just happening in downtown and Midtown, and it isn’t just about bricks and mortar,” said Kresge President and CEO Rip Rapson. “This is community development that invests in people, in the social fabric that makes neighborhoods unique. That’s what the future of this campus represents.”

K-12 Model Learning Programs

Following the phase-one ninth grade class initiation in 2019, DPSCD plans to open a kindergarten and 10th grade class in 2020, followed by the addition of another primary and secondary class annually. By 2029, all primary and high school grade classrooms will be staffed and filled; neighborhood families will have priority enrollment.

DPSCD and U-M SOE are jointly developing the K-8 and 9-12 curriculum for the schools that DPSCD will operate. Kresge will fund renovations and updates of the district’s former Bates Academy school building, on the southeast corner of the campus, to house the majority of the 1,000 primary and secondary students.

“The cradle to college model demonstrates that DPSCD can simultaneously rebuild the district and introduce innovation,” said Dr. Nikolai P. Vitti, superintendent. “The magnitude of this partnership is priceless in that it expands the city’s portfolio of high-demand, unique traditional public school options and develops a much-needed teacher pipeline with one of the top universities in the country.”

Vitti added the teacher-training component has the potential to attract college students to the teaching profession, retain teachers who otherwise leave the profession in large numbers and improve district enrollment.

“The School Board and I have been laser focused on restoring the credibility of traditional public school education so Detroit residents can send their children to the school in their neighborhood,” he said. “To achieve this, we need to establish a district that retains its best teachers and develops the next generation of dedicated teachers while supporting them in the best facilities, so each child receives a high-quality education. Detroit cannot restore its potential without a high-functioning traditional education system. Investments and partnerships such as these signal that DPSCD is on the rise and will, once again, be the preferred educational choice of its residents.”

The P-20 model has the potential to help the entire DPSCD system as it aligns with the district’s core goals of improving enrollment; improving student achievement, attendance, test scores, graduation rates and college-completion; and teacher development, retention and attraction.

“This school will not be isolated from the rest of the DPSCD system,” Vitti added. “The innovations developed here will be shared and replicated across the system for the betterment of the entire district.”

 

Read the full press release

This entry was posted in Info News Center, News and Press Releases.