DPSCD Shows Improvement in Most Accountability Areas

DETROIT – August 29, 2018 – Detroit Public Schools Community District (DPSCD) reported today that 60 percent of accountability areas associated with literacy and mathematics tested through the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress (M-STEP) and the SAT showed improvement as compared to last year.  This is a baseline year for DPSCD as schools from the Educational Achievement Authority (EAA), the majority of which are considered lower performing, returned to the district July 2017. This year’s district performance combines last year’s EAA and DPSCD performance for the first time. Despite the overall improvement in most areas, the results reinforce the need for the newly adopted K-8 Literacy and Mathematics Curriculum, training on the new standards, stronger progress monitoring tools to properly intervene when students are falling behind, and enhanced family support initiatives such as the Parent Academy and teacher home visits.

“This year’s performance is not surprising. It is positive to see slight improvement in various areas due to a greater focus on general school improvement strategies, such as increased monitoring and student data analysis, but our teachers and principals were not equipped with the right training and tools to maximize student performance yet. The investments we have made to improve teaching and learning will be felt in the classroom during the 2018-2019 school year,” said Nikolai Vitti, DPSCD Superintendent. “This summer, more than a thousand teachers, along with all of our principals, participated in multiday academies on our new curriculum and culture survey data to improve the instructional culture of our schools. Everyone needs time to now implement our new and aligned resources to demonstrate to the world what our students can achieve when supported. It was promising to see that most grade level cohorts ended last year with higher levels of proficiency than in the 2017 school year, and that a higher percentage of our early readers are making progress. We will build on this in future years.”

The assessments, administered every spring to Michigan students in grades 3 through 8 and to high school students in grade 11, provides a common measure of literacy, math and social studies achievement across the state. The results allow students, families and educators to understand progress toward grade level expectations and make meaningful plans for improvement. A summary of results, include:

  • 3 of 6 (50 percent) of grade levels improved in literacy
  • 4 of 6 (67 percent) of grade levels improved in math
  • 2 of 3 (67 percent) grade levels improved in social studies
  • 1 of 2 (50 percent) of SAT areas improved
  • Overall, 10 of 17 (60 percent) accountability areas improved
  • 5 percent of DPSCD students in grades 3-8 English Language Arts (ELA) were proficient, up 0.1 percentage point from 2017; 6.7 percent of DPSCD students in grades 3-8 Math were proficient, down 0.3 percentage points from 2017
  • Approximately half of schools (50.7 percent) increased their percentage of students proficient in ELA over 2017 results; 48 percent of increased their percentage of students proficient in math over 2017 results
  • 1 percent of fifth and eighth-grade students were proficient in Social Studies, up 1.3 percentage points from 2017
  • A greater percentage of English Language Learners earned a proficient score in ELA and Social Studies than in 2017 (13 percent proficient in ELA, up 0.8 percentage points, and 7.6 percent in Social studies, up 1.0 percentage point); results were flat for English Language Learners in Mathematics (9 percent proficient)
  • A greater percentage of third-graders were proficient in ELA than in 2017 (11.3, up 1.8 percentage points); a smaller percentage of third-graders were proficient in mathematics compared to 2017 (10.7 percent, down 1.5 percentage points)
  • Last year’s fourth, fifth, seventh and eighth grade cohorts had a higher percentage of students proficient in ELA this year than they did in the 2017 administration; in mathematics, last year’s sixth, seventh, and eight grade cohorts had a higher percentage of students proficient, but the fourth and fifth grade cohorts dipped relative to 2017 results

 

Percent Proficient in ELA: Result by Cohort 2017 2018 Change
Class of 2023 (8th Graders in 2018) 11.5 12.9 1.4
Class of 2024 (7th Graders in 2018) 9 11.7 2.7
Class of 2025 (6th Graders in 2018) 13.7 9.9 -3.8
Class of 2026 (5th Graders in 2018) 10.1 12.5 2.4
Class of 2027 (4th Graders in 2018) 9.5 11.1 1.6

 

Percent Proficient in Math: Result by Cohort 2017 2018 Change
Class of 2023 (8th Graders in 2018) 5.7 7.2 1.5
Class of 2024 (7th Graders in 2018) 4.6 5.6 1
Class of 2025 (6th Graders in 2018) 4 5.3 1.3
Class of 2026 (5th Graders in 2018) 8.2 3.8 -4.4
Class of 2027 (4th Graders in 2018) 12.2 7.4 -4.8

 

  • 4 percent of high school juniors met the SAT college readiness benchmark in mathematics, up 0.5 percentage points over 2017
  • 4 percent of high school juniors met the SAT college readiness benchmark in evidence-based reading and writing, down 1.4 percentage points over 2017

“Just as our NAEP results showed us this spring, this year’s M-STEP and SAT data further reinforces the need to do things differently, which is why it is promising to see the administration implement initiatives through our collective Strategic Plan and approved Board budget, to address these gaps, like our new curriculum, arts and music, the creation of the Master Teacher initiative and even a code of conduct that will keep students in school to learn,” said Board President, Dr. Iris Taylor.

The Michigan Department of Education provides paper-based parent reports for all students who take the M-STEP Assessment.  DPSCD families should expect these reports to be sent home with students during the month of September and are welcomed to schedule time to talk with their student’s teacher about what the results mean and how to support their child’s learning at home.

This entry was posted in Info News Center, News and Press Releases.