Clippert Academy’s annual Multicultural Luncheon draws a crowd!

Clippert Academy hosted its annual Multicultural Luncheon on Wednesday, March 25, 2015, drawing a festive crowd of parents, community leaders, business partners, current and retired educators and city officials.

Students were asked to bring in a variety of ethnic foods, dress in costumes from their cultures and participate in themed activities.

The school’s hallways and doors were elaborately transformed into distant lands from across the globe, including Japan, Egypt, Germany, India and many more! The Multicultural Luncheon was a culmination of social studies, art and other academic lessons based on each classroom’s chosen theme.

 

DPS Go Green News: Keidan Earns Points for Water Audit, Renaissance is in the Flow with Aquaponics

Keiden Scores with Successful Water Audit

The Rising Stars at Keidan Special Education Center have been working hard all year to keep their school green — from their dedicated recycling efforts to saving energy in the classrooms, these students are helping their school be sustainable and save money to boot. Most recently, students Samantha, Darius, and Javier from Ms. Hubbard’s 8th grade class performed a water audit to make sure the school isn’t wasting any water on things like leaky faucets and running toilets. After a thorough inspection, these students are happy to say they found no major leaks! Ms. Hubbard and Ms. Massingill, the two sustainability coordinators at the school, along with the office staff, are truly dedicated to the DPS Go Green Challenge mission and are also set on getting those GGC points!

Take a look at the photo below of Ms. Hubbard posing with some of the Rising Stars at Keidan Special Education Center during a patrol!

Renaissance gets into the Flow with “Aquaponics Project”

The Go Green Team at Renaissance High School is working diligently on their classroom aquaponics system to help them better understand the relationships between water, nutrients and sustainable food production. The team has recently introduced 50 goldfish to their tank, choosing a breed of fish that could be given away to interested students at Renaissance when the system is shut down over the summer months. This will also allow them to easily start with a fresh stock of fish in their system next fall.

The team has also already begun germinating seeds for squash and pumpkin that will likely be transplanted outside as they outgrow the system’s capacity. After a unanimous vote, the team has made plans to also start “salsa seeds” like cilantro, peppers and onions to enjoy in several months. Check out the photos of their progress.

Solar Design Competition Wraps Up with Awards Ceremony

Last week, Douglass Academy for Young Men hosted the Awards Dinner for the Solar Detroit Student Design Contest. The contest is a partnership between the City of Detroit and the Detroit Public Schools Go Green Challenge. It was open to all students who attend Detroit Public Schools. The contest challenged students from grades K-12 to imagine how solar energy can be a part of the revitalization of Detroit.

Winning students received a certificate signed by Mayor Mike Duggan and Councilman George Cushingberry – and a gift certificate to Edmonds Scientifics made possible by MGM Grand and the DPS Foundation.
The program included a presentation by the Bennett Elementary Bioneers who showed a video of their school going green and remarked that “The future is so bright for them, they need to wear shades!” Click here for a full list of winners with photos!

Submit YOUR News From the Schools!

Does your school have a great story to share with the other DPS Go Green schools? We’d love to feature you! You can submit a story that highlights your Green Team’s work directly by email to: DPS.gogreen@detroitk12.org or work with your AmeriCorps Green School Coordinators to develop the piece. Please include a photo or two to liven up your story!

Thank you for all that you do!

~DPS Go Green Team

Western’s McDowell, Ford’s Flowers have PSL ties that bind back to their coach-player days at Redford

Contact:
Chuck Johnson
Media Information Director
DPS Office of Athletics
chuck.johnson@detroitk12.org
 313-870-5863

Western International High’s Derrick McDowell and Henry Ford High’s Kenneth Flowers are head coaches of the Detroit Public School League’s two teams competing in the MHSAA boys’ basketball state semifinals Friday at Michigan State University’s Breslin Center.

The league allegiance is strong, but their bond goes deeper than that, back to when McDowell and Flowers were on the same team in the late ‘90s at Redford High School.

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Ford head coach Ken Flowers

“Derrick was my high school coach,’’ Flowers said. “He coached me for four years. Then I came back after college and coached under him at Redford. Later, I took over the program I helped build and establish.”

Flowers, who graduated from Redford in 1996, said he talks with McDowell, a 1978 Northern High grad, at least once a week.

McDowell

Western head coach Derrick McDowell

“Derrick taught me discipline, and how to hold kids accountable, holding study tables. I teach and coach like that. I told the guys at practice earlier this week we’re going up there early on Friday to support my mentor.”

McDowell led Redford to its first Class A final in 2002 and Flowers, who took over after McDowell left to become a college assistant, led the Huskies to the Class A semifinals in ’06 and the finals in 2007.

The fact that they have guided different PSL teams to their respective schools’ first-ever berths in the state semifinals makes this weekend’s journey to East Lansing a special occasion for the former student-athlete and his mentor.

Doing it in the same year makes it even more special. “It’s very special, not just for me but for the city,” Flowers said.

“For the PSL to have two teams up there with a chance to win a state championship in both Class A and Class B, the top two divisions, that’s never happened before. It’s surreal the way things are going right now. But it’s happening at the right time.”

Both PSL teams face tough semifinal matches in order to advance to Saturday’s championship games.

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Western 6-8 forward Gerald Blackshear

Western, unbeaten with a 24-0 record and ranked No. 1 the state, will play U-D Jesuit (22-3) at 1 p.m. Friday in the Class A semifinals, a rematch against the team the Cowboys beat 58-49 in the Operation Friendship game March 7 between the PSL and Catholic League champions.

“They probably have a little more motivation than we do having lost to us, but nobody has an advantage,” McDowell said. “We’re still playing the same way. We’re not going to change for anybody. We’ll adjust, but we won’t change.”

Western has strong guard play, led by 5-10 junior Brailen Neeley and 6-1 senior Josh McFolley, who combined to neutralize U-D Jesuit junior guard Cassius Winston in their first meeting. And with four players standing 6-7 or taller, led by 6-8 senior forward Gerald Blackshear, the Cowboys have utilized their height advantage to dominate most of their opposition.

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Western guard tandem senior Josh McFolley (left) and junior Brailen Neely

But even more than height, Western beats you with its depth. McDowell liberally rotates as many as 10-12 players into the game, and the fresh legs often lead to the Cowboys making a big spurt in the third quarter.

“We expect to do that,” McDowell said. “Because of our depth, by the time the third quarter is gone, normally other teams are pretty much shot.”

Ford (20-5) will play Cadillac (18-8) at 7:50 p.m. Friday in the Class B semifinal game. Flowers expects a dogfight against a battle-tested team.

“Cadillac has been to Breslin five years in a row, so this is familiar waters for those guys,’’ Flowers said. “Beating them is not going to be a cakewalk. Those guys are good. But we feel like we’re good, too.”

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Ford senior Josh Davis (left) and junior James Towns (right) battle Western junior Kyree Boynton for a rebound in PSL game earlier this season

Ford is led by 6-5 senior forward Josh Davis, who was voted Mr. PSL basketball by league coaches. Davis averages 17 points and 7.7 rebounds a game and has stepped up his game in the state tourney, scoring 21 points and 20 points in the Trojans’ last two victories despite foul trouble.

The Trojans’ other floor leader is 6-1 junior guard James Towns, who has guided the offense with a steady hand throughout the season and deserves to be first-team Class B all-state, Flowers said.

Lansing Everett (24-2) faces Saginaw Arthur Hill (23-3) in the other Class A semifinal Friday at 1 p.m., while Milan (24-2) and Wyoming Godwin Heights (24-1) square off in the other Class B semifinal Friday at 6 p.m.

The Class A state championship game is noon Saturday and the Class B state championship game is 6:30 p.m. Saturday.

“We wanted to contend for a PSL championship this season but we came up short,’’ Flowers said. “But winning the Class B state championship is even bigger because that’s recognition from the whole state. That’s our goal.”

Likewise, McDowell and his PSL champion Western players can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

“Our goal wasn’t to get to Breslin,” he said. “Our goal was to win it all.

“All this started last April when they were in open gyms. We won the championship in summer league at Mumford and that was the first goal. And here we are now trying to finish it off by winning a state championship. It’s been a long process putting this together.”

 

 

 

 

DPS students participate in Solar Detroit Student Design Competition

Douglass Academy for Young Men hosted an Awards Dinner for the Solar Detroit Student Design Contest on March 19, 2015. The contest is a partnership between The City of Detroit and the Detroit Public Schools Go Green Challenge.

The contest challenged students from grades K-12 to imagine how solar energy can be a part of the revitalization of Detroit. Student submissions included an essay and a drawing of their ideas.

The creativity of DPS students was on display with ideas including:
• Solar Roadways to generate electricity and melt away snow and ice
• Solar Jet to visit your Grandma
• Solar Toothbrush to keep your teeth clean
• Solar Fans to keep you cool in the summer
• Solar Touch Screen Table with phone chargers
• Solar iPod and phone chargers
• Solar powered Crime Fighting Robot
• Solar powered Litter Robot that has two collection bags on its legs, one for recycling and one for trash
• Solar City Cleaner with attachments for collecting litter, mowing grass, plowing snow and more
• A vision for turning vacant lots into wind and solar farms
• The construction of a working solar thermal array for heating homes made from recycled pop cans and reclaimed lumber

The program included a presentation by the Bennett Elementary Bioneers who showed a video of their school going green and remarked that “The future is so bright for them, they need to wear shades!”

Winning students received a certificate signed by Mayor Mike Duggan and Councilman George Cushingberry – and a gift certificate to Edmonds Scientifics made possible by MGM Grand and the DPS Foundation. The winners were:

(In the order of Category – Student Name – School – Award Amount)

K-2 Robert Rupert, Bennett: 1st Place $100
K-2 Freddy Hernandez-Morales Jr., Bennett: 2nd Place $50
K-2 Pedro Garcia-Campos, Bennett: 3rd Place $50
K-2 Brithza Marley Rios, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
K-2 Allejandro Villasenor, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
K-2 Eduardo Rivera-Velazquez, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
K-2 Miranda Pasaye, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
3-5 Tasnim Dina, Davison: 1st Place $200
3-5 Felicia San-Miguel, Bennett: 2nd Place $100
3-5 Jazmin Garcia, Bennett: 3rd Place $50
3-5 Jose Pelcastre, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
3-5 Nevonte Walker, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
3-5 Crystal Arambula, Bennett: Hon. Mention $25
6-8 Diamond Acosta, Clippert: 1st Place $300
6-8 Mohammad A. Muntakim, Davison: 2nd Place $150
6-8 Jakiya Iqbal Davison: 3rd Place $75
9-12 DaJuan Webster, Douglass: 1st Place $150
9-12 Kaleb Oates, Douglass: 1st Place $150
9-12 Michael Zellers Douglass: 1st Place $150
9-12 Jalen Warlick, Douglass: 1st Place $150
9-12 Jorden Hill, Douglass: 1st Place $150
9-12 Jonathan Enyinnah, Douglass: 1st Place $150
9-12 Rashad Trice, Douglass: 1st Place $150

Dozens of DPS families attended the Career and Technical Education enrollment fairs on Wednesday, March 25

Detroit Public Schools spotlighted the district’s Career and Technical Education offerings during an after-school enrollment fair at the district’s four Career and Technical Centers on Wednesday, March 25.

Visitors experienced hands-on experience in construction trades at A. Philip Randolph Career and Technical High School, the renowned Culinary Arts Program at Breithaupt Career and Technical Center, free health screenings by health professionals and students at Crockett Career and Technical Center and took test flights at Davis Aerospace Technical High School’s in-school flight simulator and more!

Families seeking to apply for spots in these schools should apply at the school building site for the 2015-16 school year. The Open Enrollment Period for all schools is April 18-May 1 and include additional opportunities to visit and learn more about schools.

Further information is available at 313-240-4377 or detroitk12.org/enroll

E.M. Darnell Earley and Teen Leadership Institute students discuss new 10-Point Management Plan 

Detroit Public Schools Emergency Manager Darnell Earley met with nearly 30 students from the DPS Teen Leadership Institute (TLI) today, March 25, at Breithaupt Career and Technical Center.

Earley and the student leaders enjoyed lunch created by Breithaupt’s Culinary Arts students as they discussed the students’ perspective on Earley’s newly unveiled 10-Point Management Plan. The students also shared their thoughts on what they feel is needed to guide the district toward financial stability and educational competitiveness.

“Nothing I do means anything if we fail to provide a quality education to you. Your voice matters,” Earley said to students.

TWO FOR THE SHOW! Western, Ford headed to Breslin for MHSAA boys’ basketball state semifinals

Chuck Johnson
Media Information Director
DPS Office of Athletics
chuck.johnson@detroitk12.org
313-870-5863

The Detroit Public School League will have two teams vying for Michigan High School Athletic Association boys’ basketball state championships this weekend after No. 1-ranked Western International trounced Ypsilanti Community 58-37 in the Class A quarterfinal game Tuesday at University of Detroit Mercy Calihan Hall, and Henry Ford defeated previously-unbeaten New Haven 61-55 Tuesday in the Class B quarterfinal game at Marysville High School.

Western’s victory lifted Coach Derrick McDowell’s unbeaten Cowboys to a 24-0 record and advanced them to Friday’s 2:50 p.m. Class A semifinal game at Michigan State University’s Breslin Center. They will face U-D Jesuit (22-3) in a rematch against the team they beat 58-49 in the Operation Friendship game March 7 between the PSL and Catholic League champions. U-D Jesuit advanced Tuesday with a 56-54 quarterfinal victory against Clarkston.

Coach Ken Flowers Ford Trojans (20-5) will play Cadillac (18-8) in Friday’s 7:50 p.m. Class B semifinal game at MSU’s Breslin Center. Cadillac advanced with a 59-50 quarterfinal victory against Essexville Garber.

Lansing Everett (24-2) faces Saginaw Arthur Hill (23-3) in the other Class A semifinal Friday at 1 p.m., while Milan (24-2) and Wyoming Godwin Heights (24-1) square off in the other Class B semifinal Friday at 6 p.m.

For planning purposes, the Class A state championship game is noon Saturday at Breslin and the Class B state championship game is 6:30 p.m. Saturday at Breslin.

Come out and support our Proud Strong Learners for Western and Ford as they go for the state championship!

 

 

Western, Ford boys in MHSAA basketball quarterfinal games tonight with Breslin in sight

Contact:
Chuck Johnson
Media Information Director
DPS Office of Athletics
chuck.johnson@detroitk12.org
313-870-5863

Western High, the state’s No. 1-ranked team, can lift an already 23-0 memorable season to historic proportions tonight (Tuesday, March 24) at 7 p.m. in the Class A boys’ basketball quarterfinal game against Ypsilanti Community (19-4) at University of Detroit Mercy Calihan Hall.

DSC_0128A victory would advance Coach Derrick McDowell’s Cowboys to the state semifinal game Friday (2:50 p.m.) at Michigan State University’s Breslin Center against the winner of U-D Jesuit (21-3) vs. Clarkston (24-0), tonight’s 5:30 p.m. quarterfinal at Calihan Hall.

Fans are urged to get to Calihan early because both quarterfinal games have attracted massive local and statewide interest.

Western is playing its best basketball and has moved within sight of the school’s first MHSAA boys’ basketball state championship. The Cowboys entered the tourney on fire after capturing their first Detroit Public School League boys’ basketball crown since 1922.

The PSL is also represented in the Class B quarterfinals by Henry Ford. Coach Ken Flowers’ Trojans (19-5) will play New Haven (25-0) tonight, March 24, at 7 p.m. at Marysville High School, with the winner advancing to Friday’s 7:50 p.m. state semifinal game at MSU’s Breslin Center against the Essexville Garber (21-4) vs. Cadillac (17-8) quarterfinal winner.IMG_0175

Flowers, who is also Ford’s athletic director, says his team hopes to feed off support from two busloads of fans expected to make the trip to Marysville.

Western’s and Ford’s boys are trying to succeed where King High’s Lady Crusaders came up short last weekend, losing in the Class A girls’ state semifinals 57-37 against eventual champion Bloomfield Hills Marian, which won for the second year in a row.

Come out and support our Proud Strong Learners as they go for the state championship!!

Detroit Public Schools to spotlight Career and Technical Education during after school enrollment events Wednesday, March 25

Detroit Public Schools will place a spotlight on the district’s Career and Technical Education offerings during an after-school enrollment fair at the district’s four Career and Technical Centers on Wednesday, March 25.

A. Philip Randolph Career and Technical High School, 17101 Hubbell St., 4:00-6:00 p.m.

On Wednesday, visitors will hear how Randolph students gain a hands-on experience in construction trades. Offerings include business partnerships with industry leaders and a new 9th Grade Career Academy program. Students can earn a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, trade skill certification and paid internships through extensive coursework.

Breithaupt Career and Technical Center, 9300 Hubbell St., 3:30-5:30 p.m.

On Wednesday, Breithaupt Career and Technical Center students will demonstrate skills used in the restaurant, cosmetology, automotive fields and more! Offerings include academic and technical content for grades 10-12; strong employability skills; renowned Culinary Arts Program Coursework; Training in Automotive and Technology Services; Computer Aided Drafting; Welding and Cutting; Cosmetology; Business Administration.

Crockett Career and Technical Center, 571 Mack Ave., 3:30-5:30 p.m.

Located in the heart of Detroit Medical Center, Crockett prepares students for careers in a laboratory or an inpatient setting. Offerings include Phlebotomy and Patient Care Assisting; Pre-Nursing & Clinical experience; CPR Certification; Career Counseling; HIPAA and Privacy Training. On Wednesday, visitors can participate in free health screenings by health professionals and students during an on-site Health Fair.

Golightly Career and Technical Center/Davis Aerospace Technical High School, 900 Dickerson Ave., 3:30-5:30 p.m.

At Golightly Career and Technical Center, which is located on the same campus as Davis Aerospace Technical High School, visitors on Wednesday will learn about programs geared toward high wage jobs, internships, scholarships, and the center’s five-week entrepreneurial class, which explores Business Management Practicum. Visitors also can take a test flight in Davis’ in-school flight simulator.

Families seeking to apply for spots in these schools should apply at the school building site for the 2015-16 school year. An Open Enrollment Period for all schools will follow April 18-May 1 and include additional opportunities to visit and learn more about schools.

Further information is available at 313-240-4377 or detroitk12.org/enroll

School of the Week: Adult Education- East Campus

This service-oriented school nurtures not only the educational success of its adult students, but scores of their children across DPS

It’s a family affair.

The teaching and learning that takes place by the instructors and adults in the GED and Adult Basic Education programs at DPS’ Adult Education Center East impact not only those participants, but also the more than 200 Detroit Public Schools K-12 students whose parents and grandparents are enrolled here.

Many of the adult learners are doing it for their kids.

David Alexander is at the Center every day, all year. “I’m serious about completing this. I have grandkids and they can mouth off a lot about what they don’t want to do.” Through his studies and upon completion, he intends to be an even stronger role model for them. Never before a computer user, the 64-year-old had no previous experience on computers, but now describes himself as “kind of savvy” as he works in a classroom with six other students, completing Reading 180 and Math programs as well as research and book reports.

Twenty-nine-year-old Dana Mitchell has two children enrolled and one yet to enter Thurgood Marshall Elementary-Middle School. “My focus is to graduate, go on to medical school and become an RN or medical assistant,” says Mitchell. “I plan to support my family of three children and our lifestyle….I’m going to spoil them rotten.”

Three of Darnisha Smith’s children graduated before her. As she awaits her program completion, the new participant in the district’s inaugural ‘Earn and Learn’ initiative says, “My children will see my progress.” Earn and Learn, launched this winter, provides Smith, several other Adult Ed East students and others an opportunity to return to school, receive a GED and become employed by the district. “It’s a great thing for me,” Smith says.

Some are doing it for a parent.

Student Reginald Landers, showing off a successful 166 score on one of his tests, envisions the day when three members of his family—he, his father and his sister—will all walk across the stage together to graduate. His goal to get the GED is rooted in wanting to reduce some of his hardworking father’s current, sole financial responsibility for the family. “I want to relieve some of his stress and allow him to relax a bit.”

Other family members are doing it together, such as 19-year-old Kayla and Shayla Higgins, one of two sets of twins currently enrolled in the building which is just around the block from their home. With only two months to go toward program completion, Kayla is completing an algebra assignment and Shayla a Science project in the same Adult Basic Education classroom where student and DPS parent Dana Mitchell is studying Spanish.

This school for adults ultimately has a vital role in the traditional K-12 educational program across the district. Overall, 75% of the Adult Ed East Center’s student body are parents or grandparents of other DPS students.

“I want to know everybody.”

Contributing to the family atmosphere of the pristine, former Richard Elementary School facility, with its well-lit classrooms and shiny hallway floors, Principal Leonard Samborski quickly demonstrates that he knows each of his students’ personal stories and defines his role as a caring and deeply interested partner in their success.

“It’s part of developing a positive relationship with them,” he states. “They have to have a level of trust. They have been disappointed a lot before arriving here.” Samborski also knows the students families, counselors and sometimes their probation officers.

The principal greets the school’s administrative assistant, Demetrius Herron who himself completed this program in June 2011. Herron now fills a number of roles at the school and uses his own experience regarding how the program works to assist others, such as stepping up to handle all enrollments this past year while the school’s counselor position remained unfilled.

Samborski describes the changes that he and the school’s staff have seen in Herron since he himself enrolled here. “He has matured. Now he has goals. Along the way he got married, had children, and will go to college.”

Samborski attributes the extremely tidy facility to the pride that its program participants demonstrate.

There’s nothing to it but to do it.

There are examples of support and encouragement everywhere, including on many boards, posters and signs. One reminds, “I can do it.” Another, “There’s nothing to it but to do it.”

Every need is supported, every service provided

Unlike the twins who walk around the corner to come to the school, most Adult Education-East students ride the bus, and the school provides bus tickets “by the thousands,” according to Samborski. Some 700 tickets and bus transfers are distributed weekly.

Computer skills are taught because they are now essential with the new computer-based GED test. The school provides counseling and career coaching and like its sister institution on the city’s west side has a large, comfortable student study lounge. A learning lab is provided based on a partnership with Dominican Literacy and tutors are provided through a partnership with Reading Works. An Institute for Population Health staff member, Tahira Khalid, is onsite two-three days each week to provide a wide array of health and parenting services and, in general, “to soften the harshness of the system.”

Adult Ed East services students 18 years or older with high school completion, GED Preparation classes as well as A.B.E. (Adult Basic Education) classes in language arts, social studies, math and science.

Something you didn’t know…

The school also sponsors English as a Second Language programs offsite in two vibrant classrooms located in the basement of Midtown Detroit’s International Institute. Teacher Martha Dage presides in one class with some 40 students enrolled with a half dozen different native languages including Haitian, Dominican, Yemeni, Chinese and Nigerian. “It’s fun,” she says. “I love English because it’s a very forgiving language to teach.”